The Other Side

Where The Grass Is Always Greener

Mammal Monday – Cloudy With a Chance

The clouded leopard is found in the Himalayan foothills of mainland Southeast Asia. Since 2008, it has been classified on the IUCN Red List as “Vulnerable.” The total population size of clouded leopards is suspected to be fewer than 10,000 mature adults.


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Frog Friday – The “Pobblebonk”

Did you know?

This species of frog is also called the “pobblebonk” after its distinctive “bonk” call, which is likened to the sound of a banjo string being plucked.

Listen to the sound below:

Listen to the call of the Eastern Banjo Frog


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Weedy Wednesday – Kudzu

Did you know?

Although native to Asia, Kudzu is among the most widespread and abundant invasive weeds in the eastern United States. It densely covers over 1.2 to 2.8 million hectares of land in the South. This area is thought to be increasing on the order of 50,000 hectares per year.


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Unit 4 Exam – December 6th

Our Unit 4 exam will take place in class on this upcoming Block Day. The focus of this exam is cellular reproduction, including cell division and mitosis, meiosis, and reproductive life cycles. These topics are covered in textbook Chapter 5 & Section 6.1.

Due to the wide range of material covered in this unit, the activities on the REVIEW page will be especially helpful in preparation for this exam. The “A Stem Cell Story” Video Assignment are also useful resources for you to review.

Remember that the Test Preparation Checklist (TPC) is intended to help students know what to expect on the exam, including the type and number of questions. The study log on the back of the TPC is to be completed and turned it in on the day of the test. Students who complete the TPC will earn a point back on the exam.

As with our other unit exams, the multiple choice part of the exam will be taken on the classroom computers using the ExamView Player software.


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Mammal Monday – First Furry Fossil

Did you know?

Castorocauda lutrasimilis was a semi-aquatic member of the order Docodonta, an extinct group of primitive mammals. As the name implies, it resembled a beaver or otter (“castoro” = beaver, “cauda” = tail, “lutra” = otter, “similis” = similar). However, its similarities to these modern mammals are thought to have been the result of convergent evolution. The only Castorocauda fossil was discovered in 2004 in China in rock beds dating back to 164 million years ago. This fossil was so well preserved that important evidence of its mammalian identity — hair — was preserved. This represents the oldest fur ever found in the fossil record.

Keep reading to watch a video featuring Castorocauda.

Continue reading


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Frog Friday – Toad-ally!

Did you know?

The cane toad is considered a pest in many of its introduced regions, particularly Australasia. Of particular concern with this invasive species is that its skin is toxic. Many native predators are killed after ingesting cane toads.


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Weedy Wednesday – Velcro? What a Rip Off!

 

The hooked spines of the plant known as common burdock were the inspiration for the invention of Velcro by George de Mestral, a Swiss inventor.


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | 2 Comments

Mammal Monday – A Whale of a Tale

Did you know?

“About 55 million years ago, at the start of the Eocene epoch, a branch of artiodactyls (the even-toed ungulates represented today by pigs and deer) veered off onto the evolutionary line that slowly led to modern whales. The ancient artiodactyl Indohyus is important because (at least according to some paleontologists) it belonged to a sister group of the earliest prehistoric whales, and was closely related to genera like Pakicetus, which lived a few million years earlier.”

From About.com


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Frog Friday – Callobatrachus

This extinct species is important because, according to the scientists who discovered this fossil specimen, Callobatrachus “is a linkage between aquatic and terrestrial life forms, representing a great success in evolution.”


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment

Weedy Wednesday – Dangerous Beauty

The purple loosestrife is an introduced invasive species in North America where it is now widely dispersed. A single plant may produce over a million tiny seeds annually, leading to huge infestations. Although quite striking, purple loosestrife infestations can result in significant disruption of water flow in streams and rivers along with a sharp decline in biological diversity. The decline in biodiversity comes about as native plant species, most notably cattails, are crowded out by the infestation. As a result, the life cycles of many other organisms are affected, from water-dwelling bird species to frogs to algae.


Written by Mr. Mohn | Tagged | Leave a Comment